Jane and Louise Wilson – 3 New digital editons – Out Now

Jane & Louise Wilson, False Positives, False Negatives, 2011-2013.   FavoriteLoadingFavorite
Jane & Louise Wilson, False Positives, False Negatives, 2011-2013. Jane & Louise Wilson’s digital photograph False Positives, False Negatives, 2011, is a portrait of both artists side by side with black and white make-up on each their faces known as ‘dazzle camouflage’. Dazzle camouflage in the form of face-painting is known to scramble face recognition software widely used in public digital surveillance photography, including border controls at airports, and CCTV. The markings on faces break apart the general figurative properties of the human face and make it undetectable to the computer-vision algorithms used in face detection.

False Positives, False Negatives, 2011, is one of a series of images accompanying the film Face Scripting: What did the Building See?. The latter deals with the assassination of Hamas operative Mahmoud Al-Mabhouh by Mossad agents in a hotel in Dubai, in January 2010. The artists display extensive CCTV footage of the event next to a detailed examination of the hotel itself. Work: Still – High-resolution image (PNG). Edition: 1,000. Price: €6.

Jane & Louise Wilson, Pagoda, Lab 5 H-bomb test facility, Orford Ness, 2013.
Jane & Louise Wilson, Pagoda, Lab 5 H-bomb test facility, Orford Ness, 2013.Jane & Louise Wilson's black and white digital photograph Pagoda, H-bomb test facility, Lab 5, 2012, depicts a so-called ‘pagoda’ built on the former Cold War military site off the Suffolk shores, Orford Ness. The complex was constructed to house a covert H-bomb test site for the U.K. Atomic Weapons Research Establishment that was active until the early 1980s. Inside the pagodas or laboratories, vibration testing for the development of the H-bomb could be monitored. Jane Wilson: "We were intrigued by the architecture because it was built solely to test the casing of the H-bomb, a kind of nuclear experimentation, and there is something very pure about a function that dictates its form in terms of architecture." Louise Wilson: "The pagodas were specifically designed so that in the event of an explosion the uprights supporting the lid or the roof would blow out causing the surrounding shingle to fall inside and the roof to come down and contain the blast."

Pagoda, H-bomb test facility, Lab 5, is a still image from the artists’ work The Toxic Camera, a film that takes as it's starting point the fateful story of Ukrainian filmmaker Vladimir Shevchenko, who travelled to Chernobyl three days after the explosion at reactor four to document it's destruction and aftermath. Today, Orford Ness is a National Nature Reserve. Work: Still – High-resolution image (PNG). Edition: 1,000. Price: €6.

Jane & Louise Wilson, The New Brutalists, 2013.
Jane & Louise Wilson, The New Brutalists, 2013. Jane & Louise Wilson’s digital photograph The New Brutalists, 2004, was created by the artists in reaction to a proto-feminist suffragette image taken in 1910 that was included in a 1953 Architectural Review Article entitled “The New Brutalism” (referring to the post-war British architects and artist collective known as ‘The Independent Group’). Jane & Louise Wilson collaborated with gymnasts at Heathrow Gymnasium, London, in order to create the photograph. Contemporary athletes are dressed to look as if from another period - awarding a mordant quality to the image; which however is contrasted by the playfulness of the exercises. The women seem to employ a kind of visual rhythm through their uniformed bodies and repetitious movements - all of which become reflected in the patterns of the gym equipment’s bars and cables. The effect is one of constant surveillance as subjects: the gymnasts become aware of being observed and employ their own kind of self-surveillance. They evoke a sense of still living memories; of progress that has came to an end.

The New Brutalists, has been shown along the five-screen video installation Erewhon, first exhibited at Lisson Gallery, London, in 2006, in an exhibition titled The New Brutalists. Jane & Louise Wilson: “If modernist programmes fast-forwarding us to the future are unrealised, then what remains of them in the present are like spectres.” Work: Still – High-resolution image (PNG). Edition: 1,000. Price: €6.

All three editions are part of s[edition]’s dynamic pricing model. As edition availability decreases the price of the work increases.
This limited Jane and Louise Wilson digital editions are available on s[edition] here

 

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